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Etna volcano - eruption update: archive May 2017 - Dec 2020

Aktualisiert: 27. Sep. 2022 20:08 GMT -
Strombolian activity inside Bocca Nuova filmed
Update Sat 06 Feb 2021 17:08
Strombolian activity of Etna's Bocca Nuova on 3 Feb 2021 (image: Michele Mammino / youtube)
Strombolian activity of Etna's Bocca Nuova on 3 Feb 2021 (image: Michele Mammino / youtube)
Strombolian activity this evening from the New SE crater (image: INGV webcam)
Strombolian activity this evening from the New SE crater (image: INGV webcam)
Beautiful strombolian activity from at least 4 different crater continues with little changes, dominantly from the two vents of the New SE crater, but also from the central crater (Voragine) and the Bocca Nuova crater located west of the Voragine.
The activity of Bocca Nuova, not usually visible on webcam views or pictures taken from below, was documented a few days ago by Michele Mammino, a regular visitor of the volcano and its eruptions:

The video, taken from the western rim, shows that there is mild strombolian activity from a vent in the western part of the crater, where a cinder cone is currently forming. In addition, there are active hornitos with degassing and occasional spattering further to the east in the crater.
The products of this activity, not visible usually from below, have been filling the crater floor and covering the last winter's lava flows that had been descending from the new cone in the neighboring Voragine crater.
Continuing strombolian activity from several craters
Update Wed 03 Feb 2021 14:50
Strombolian eruptions at Etna's New SE crater (r) and Voragine (l) (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Strombolian eruptions at Etna's New SE crater (r) and Voragine (l) (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Earthquakes under Etna during the past 24 hours
Earthquakes under Etna during the past 24 hours
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
The volcano continues to produce spectacular strombolian-type explosions involving several of its summit craters.
Protagonist of this activity remains the New SE crater with two active vents, followed by less-intense activity at the Voragine and occasionally Bocca Nuova central craters.
At the same time, micro-seismic activity remains elevated. A small swarm of magnitudes at shallow depth beneath the summit region has been detected during the past 24 hours. So far, there have been 15 quakes of magnitudes up to 2.1.
Volcanic tremor stays at high levels, but shows no clear trend. The current activity of Etna seems to be rather stable.
Activity decreases a bit
Update Thu 28 Jan 2021 09:13
Strombolian explosion at Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania thermal webcam, view from S)
Strombolian explosion at Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania thermal webcam, view from S)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
During the night, volcanic tremor descended a bit (although remains high) and the strombolian activity concentrated at the New SE crater with occasional bursts also from Voragine central crater decreased as well.
Apparently, the configuration of the principal crater of the SE cone has changed recently in a way that many glowing bombs now land on the upper eastern slope of the cone, giving often the impression of short lava flows.


Intense strombolian activity
Update Wed 27 Jan 2021 08:08
Intense activity at Etna's SE crater this morning (image: LAVE webcam)
Intense activity at Etna's SE crater this morning (image: LAVE webcam)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Europe's most active volcano remains highly active, erupting from at least two of its summit craters: although visibility has been very poor, intermittent clear views allow to see intense strombolian-type activity from the New SE crater and the Voragine central crater.
The latter is less frequent and not as strong as the activity at the protagonist New SE crater. Tremor has been high and showing a steady increasing trend, indicating that magma is currently flowing towards the surface at increased rate.
Whether there will be another paroxysm with lava fountains soon is open to speculation at the moment.
Eruptive episode from New SE crater with new lava flow
Update Wed 20 Jan 2021 08:29
Strong activity at Etna's New SE crater during the night (image: LAVE webcam from Schiena dell'Asino)
Strong activity at Etna's New SE crater during the night (image: LAVE webcam from Schiena dell'Asino)
Lava flow on the NE side of the cone (image: INGV thermal webcam from Monte Cagliato)
Lava flow on the NE side of the cone (image: INGV thermal webcam from Monte Cagliato)
Last night's activity of vigorous and near-constant strombolian explosions from the eastern summit vent of the New SE crater continued to increase, but judging from webcam imagery, it did not quite reach the intensity of previous paroxysms with true lava fountains.
During the most intense phase, starting around 1:45 am local time, a new lava flow was emitted from either the same vent at the summit of the New SE crater or a fissure beneath it, and descended approx. 200-300 m to the flat area at its northeastern base.
Video:

Whether or not it might be formally counted as a (weak) paroxysm is up to volcanologists to decide.
Increasing activity, likely heading to another paroxysm
Update Wed 20 Jan 2021 00:17
Strong explosions from Etna's New SE crater this evening
Strong explosions from Etna's New SE crater this evening
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
During the past hours, activity from the New SE crater has been increasing significantly and is currently showing intense and near-constant strombolian explosions. It seems very much as if it is heading for another paroxysm in the next hours if not less.
The volcanic tremor signal is also on an increasing trend.
During most of the day, when visibility allowed views, there were small and irregular ash emissions, likely related to smaller explosions from the New SE crater. In the evening, constant glow and intermittent explosions were visible. These have been increasing significantly during the past few hours.
New paroxysm from SE crater last night
Update Tue 19 Jan 2021 16:26
Lava fountain from Etna's New SE crater last night (image: Massimo Lo Giudice / facebook)
Lava fountain from Etna's New SE crater last night (image: Massimo Lo Giudice / facebook)
Eruption seen from the INGV webcam on Monte Cagliato on the east flank (image: INGV Catania)
Eruption seen from the INGV webcam on Monte Cagliato on the east flank (image: INGV Catania)
The short-lived eruption is also visible by a pronounced peak in tremor (image: INGV Catania)
The short-lived eruption is also visible by a pronounced peak in tremor (image: INGV Catania)
Yesterday evening, activity at the volcano increased quickly into another phase of lava fountaining, known as paroxysm, from the New SE crater.
It followed the slow effusion of a lava flow from the same vent that had started in the morning. It is thought that the lava effusion during the da preceding the eruption at night was the result of fresh, gas-rich magma rising in the conduits, and pushing the older, largely degassed magma out first, which would explain the lava effusion.
The peak of the intense eruptive phase was around 9:30 pm local time. The eruption produced a tall ash column that rose to 4000 m altitude and drifted south and southeast. The Ash Advisory Center of Toulouse relayed reports of ash falls in the village of Fleri on the SE side of Etna.
The event also generated several lava flows from the New SE crater that descended to the south and east of it, reaching the Valle del Bove depression. The paroxysm ended at around 10 pm.
Lesser ash emissions continued throughout the night and today.
Last night's eruption marks the 4th paroxysm in a new series that had started on 13 Dec last year.
Image credit: Massimo Lo Giudice (facebook)
Lava flow from New SE crater
Update Sun 17 Jan 2021 16:55
Lava flow from Etna's New SE crater this morning seen on the INGV thermal webcam
Lava flow from Etna's New SE crater this morning seen on the INGV thermal webcam
Strombolian activity from the New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam)
Strombolian activity from the New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam)
Activity from Voragine also last night
Activity from Voragine also last night
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
This morning, the ongoing eruptive activity at the volcano changed: a lava flow started to emerge from a vent on the eastern summit of the New SE crater and quickly descended to its base.
At the same time, the strombolian activity from the New SE crater's main vent and, less frequently, from the Voragine central crater, decreased a bit (but continue). Both had been quite impressive during the past days, especially the activity at the New SE crater. While fluctuating and at times being intense, it had not intensified to another paroxysm (lava fountaining episode) such as on 13-14, 21 and 22 Dec last month, something that had been more or less expected.
Volcanic tremor is currently moderate to high, but not showing significant variations compared to previous days.
It might be worth mentioning that 3 quakes of magnitudes above 3 occurred under the volcano yesterday. Some were felt by people in the area. Whether they indicate magma movements and further changes in activity in the near future remains speculation. As usual, Etna, always good for surprises, will tell us the answer!
Intense strombolian activity from New SE crater and Voragine
Update Sun 03 Jan 2021 18:44
Strombolian eruption from Etna's Voragine central crater (l) and strong glow from the SE crater in the right foreground (image taken on 2 Jan 2021 evening by Domenico Mazzaglia / facebook)
Strombolian eruption from Etna's Voragine central crater (l) and strong glow from the SE crater in the right foreground (image taken on 2 Jan 2021 evening by Domenico Mazzaglia / facebook)
Strong activity from the New SE crater tonight (image: INGV webcam on Montagnola)
Strong activity from the New SE crater tonight (image: INGV webcam on Montagnola)
The volcano continues to show beautiful and sometimes quite spectacular strombolian activity from both the New SE crater and the Voragine central crater.
During the past day, the latter had been more intense, while today, activity seems to have focused towards the main vent of the New SE crater, formerly known as the "saddle vent", now a deep crater half open on its SE side due to the dramatic changes during the recent paroxysms. This is nicely visible in Domenico Mazzaglia's photo attached (source on facebook).
Glowing lava bombs are being ejected to heights of up to 100-200 m and often land on the crater's outer slopes.
Earthquake activity has declined for now and volcanic tremor levels show no significant variations. However, this can change quickly.
Earthquakes rattle volcano's southern flank
Update Sat 02 Jan 2021 15:25
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during 31 Dec 2020-2Jan 2021
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during 31 Dec 2020-2Jan 2021
Steaming from the New SE crater (image: LAVE webcam)
Steaming from the New SE crater (image: LAVE webcam)
A series of earthquakes shook the flanks of Etna volcano during the past days. Since the afternoon of 31 Dec 2020 until this morning, a swarm of tremors has occurred at depths of 10-15 km mainly under the southern flank of the volcano.
A total of almost 40 quakes of magnitudes of up to 3.8 have been recorded, most of them on 31 Dec and early 1 Jan. The strongest quakes were widely felt by people living on the southern slopes of Etna.
There are no signs that that these quakes have affected the activity at the summit craters, which has been calming down gradually, and seems to consist only of sporadic (if any) weak strombolian activity and some ash emissions from the New SE crater and, to lesser extent, the Voragine central crater.
It is unclear whether the earthquakes were volcanic in origin, but they might well be so, possibly caused by deep magmatic intrusions that pressurize deep reservoirs and break up rocks in the mantle to create space, resulting in small earthquakes. Ultimately, they might but not necessarily need to be precursors of a new phase of activity, something that only Etna knows at the present.
Strombolian activity from New SE crater
Update Mon 28 Dec 2020 20:40
Strombolian eruptions from Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: LAVE webcam from Schiena dell'Asino)
Strombolian eruptions from Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: LAVE webcam from Schiena dell'Asino)
Tremor signal showing a slow, steady increase lately (image: INGV Catania)
Tremor signal showing a slow, steady increase lately (image: INGV Catania)
Although no paroxysm has occurred since the last one almost a week ago (on 22 Dec), Etna continues to erupt, mainly from the eastern summit vent of the New SE crater.
Intense strombolian activity is currently taking place there, with a slow, but noticeable tendency to increase during the past day. Whether this might be heading towards another fire fountaining phase (paroxysm) in a nearer future can only be speculated upon.
Mild strombolian activity and moderate ash emissions
Update Wed 23 Dec 2020 16:45
Weak strombolian activity and dense steam-ash emissions from the eastern vent (r) of Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: INGV webcam)
Weak strombolian activity and dense steam-ash emissions from the eastern vent (r) of Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: INGV webcam)
Ash emission from the saddle vent of the New SE crater in the early afternoon
Ash emission from the saddle vent of the New SE crater in the early afternoon
Strombolian eruption at the eastern vent early today
Strombolian eruption at the eastern vent early today
After the latest paroxysm from the New SE crater early yesterday morning, the volcano has continued to produce mild strombolian activity, mainly from the eastern summit vent of the SE crater complex.
The saddle vent on the summit of the crater, which has been protagonist during the recent paroxysms, has been producing steam and ash emissions, sometimes relatively intense and forming columns of several hundred meters in height, but only few incandescent ejections. This activity seems to have been on the increase during today's afternoon.
What will be next remains to be seen...
Another paroxysm with lava fountains
Update Tue 22 Dec 2020 10:27
Lava fountain from Etna's New SE crater early this morning (image: LAVE webcam)
Lava fountain from Etna's New SE crater early this morning (image: LAVE webcam)
Activity of Etna after the end of the lava fountaining phase showing the two lava flows (image: Boris Behncke / INGV Catania)
Activity of Etna after the end of the lava fountaining phase showing the two lava flows (image: Boris Behncke / INGV Catania)
The lava flow on the NE side of the New SE crater (image: Alessandro Lo Piccolo / facebook)
The lava flow on the NE side of the New SE crater (image: Alessandro Lo Piccolo / facebook)
A third paroxysm occurred at the volcano in the early morning hours today, following the previous one after almost exactly 24 hours.
After around 2 am local time, the New SE crater showed increasing strombolian activity from its main vent (the so-called saddle vent), as well as, to lesser degree, from the eastern summit vent. This activity continued to increase until a phase of lava fountaining set in around 5 am that lasted approx. one hour.
As during the previous paroxysm, a lava flow was issued from the fracture beneath the vent during the height of activity. It branched into two flows, one directed SW towards the 2002 and Monte Frumento Supino cones, overlapping the previously emplaced flows, the other SE into the Valle del Bove, visible in this video:

As lava flows traveled over snow, occasional phreatomagmatic explosionsdue to rapid evaporation of trapped snow pockets occurred from time to time.
Another lava flow traveled from the summit vent down on the NE side, as shown beautifully by the photos of Alessandro Lo Piccolo on facebook:

Posted by Alessandro Lo Piccolo on Tuesday, December 22, 2020

After the decline of activity, mild strombolian explosions have been continuing at the summit vent. It seems very likely that this is the start of a new series of paroxysm. The next one might occur in the near future, but only Etna knows exactly...

Etna volcano (Italy): earthquake swarm beneath eastern flank, ongoing lava activity

So, 24. Jan 2021, 13:53
13:53 PM | VON: T
Earthquakes today under Etna, locations (top) and time vs depth plot (below)
Earthquakes today under Etna, locations (top) and time vs depth plot (below)
View of strombolian activity from New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam on Montagnola)
View of strombolian activity from New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam on Montagnola)
This morning, a swarm of small earthquakes occurred beneath the eastern flank of the volcano. The seismic activity started early this morning at around 6 am local time.
So far, almost 50 quakes have been recorded with magnitudes of up to 2.3, and the activity seems to be continuing.
Most quakes were located at depth between 10-20 km and are arranged in a east-west trending linear area between the summit and Giarre town, mostly centered below the town of Sant'Alfio.
The location of quakes in a E-W pattern suggests that a fault zone has been activated in this area. Whether it is associated with magma intrusion along a corresponding dyke at depth, or caused purely by tectonic movements, or a combination of both, is difficult to say.
At the surface, Etna continues to be very active. When visibility allowed, glow and strombolian-type explosions could be seen from the New SE crater as well as Voragine central crater, and possible other vents as well. Volcanic tremor remains elevated, reflecting the current above-average supply of magma reaching the vents as lava.

Etna volcano (Italy): new paroxysm from SE crater

Mo, 21. Dez 2020, 12:24
12:24 PM | VON: T
The eruption column of Etna volcano this morning (image: Andrea Pulvirenti / facebook)
The eruption column of Etna volcano this morning (image: Andrea Pulvirenti / facebook)
Intense strombolian activity from the New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam)
Intense strombolian activity from the New SE crater last night (image: INGV webcam)
Tremor signal showing the steep peak of activity earlier today (image: INGV)
Tremor signal showing the steep peak of activity earlier today (image: INGV)
Another lava-fountaining episode (paroxysm) occurred this morning at the volcano.
Visibility of the new eruptive phase was very limited due to dense clouds, but some observers could catch glimpses of the lava fountain and ash column that rose several kilometers. It appears that the new paroxysm was shorter but stronger than the previous paroxysm on 13-14 Dec.
A sharp peak in tremor accompanied the event, which seems to have lasted less than two hours, as typical for Etna's paroxysms. Preceding the eruption today, the New SE crater had been showing intense strombolian activity in the past few days, with increasing tendency during the last night.
Given two paroxysms in just over a week and Etna's tendency to produce such events in series at roughly regular intervals during certain phases (such as in 2000 or 2011-13), it could be a beginning of a new series of paroxysms in the coming days, weeks or months.
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Links / Quelle:

Etna volcano (Italy): strong eruption from New SE crater

Mo, 14. Dez 2020, 00:37
00:37 AM | VON: T
Eruption of Etna volcano this evening (image: INGV webcam)
Eruption of Etna volcano this evening (image: INGV webcam)
The moment the dense ash plume drifts towards the camera, blocking most of the view
The moment the dense ash plume drifts towards the camera, blocking most of the view
A strong eruptive episode (likely to be classified as paroxysm) is now in progress at the volcano's New SE summit crater: starting from around 21:20 local time on 13 Dec evening, strombolian activity from one of the crater's vents (likely the so-called saddle vent) began to increase gradually.
Activity quickly intensified again an hour later, accompanied by a strongly rising signal of volcanic tremor indicating rapid magma flux towards the surface. Although difficult to judge from webcam imagery, it appears that the crater started to produce lava fountains of up to perhaps a few 100 m height, as well as a tall and dense ash plume that rose to estimated 5 km altitude, according to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center Toulouse.
At the same time, a rapidly advancing lava flow emerged from either the summit or a new flank vent on the southern slope of the crater, branching into two main arms flowing around the 2002 craters.
The activity at the time of this update is still continuing. More details will be likely be published by the volcano observatory in the morning.
Here's a time-lapse of the INGV webcam on Montagnola:


UPDATE Mon 14 Dec morning:
Volcanologists confirmed that the eruption took place from both the so-called saddle vent between the older and younger summits of the SE crater complex as well as a fissure that opened on the SW flank of the cone.
During the peak of activity yesterday late evening, lava fountains were produced from both vents and two lava flows were issued, one traveling to the SW west of the 2002 craters towards Monte Frumento Supino, the other SE to the Torre del Filosofo area.

Etna volcano (Italy): strombolian activity from SE crater continues

Di, 20. Okt 2020, 13:32
13:32 PM | VON: T
Strombolian activity from Etna's SE crater on Saturday night
Strombolian activity from Etna's SE crater on Saturday night
Volcanic activity at continues with little changes during the past months. When observed over the last weekend during our recent our small group tour to Stromboli and Etna, we observed mild to moderate strombolian explosions at the New SE crater.
This activity was fluctuating between very weak and only intermittent to near-continuous and moderately strong, with incandescent lava bombs ejected to approx. 100 m above the crater rims. Mild ash emissions often accompanied the activity. A more active phase occurred during the afternoon and evening of Saturday, accompanied by a small rise in volcanic tremor.
Weak glow from the central crater also suggests that the Voragine vent remains active as well, although we did not see any explosions. No activity was observed from the NE crater, which had been very active in the previous months.

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): strong strombolian activity continues

Do, 8. Okt 2020, 08:02
08:02 AM | VON: MARTIN
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano yesterday (image: @etnaboris/twitter)
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano yesterday (image: @etnaboris/twitter)
The activity of the volcano continues at elevated levels due to ongoing strong strombolian activity from the New SE crater.
On 7 October at 06:35 local time INGV recorded strong strombolian eruption associated with scoria ejected from the crater and an ash plume that reached 15,000 ft (4,600 m) altitude. Volcanic ash is dispersed towards the east-southeast and causes moderate ash fall on the volcano's slopes.
A tremor has not shown significant variations.
The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 8 October 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): increased explosive activity

Do, 1. Okt 2020, 14:23
14:23 PM | VON: MARTIN
Ash emissions from Etna volcano today (image: @tryskeles/twitter)
Ash emissions from Etna volcano today (image: @tryskeles/twitter)
The strombolian activity of the volcano continues at elevated levels characterized by minor ash emissions.
A dense dark ash plume at New SE crater occurred at 08:00-09:30 local time today, which reached approx. 28,000 ft (8,534 m) altitude and drifted E.
Tremor has shown fluctuating variations at moderate to high levels including periods of high amplitude.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 1 October 2020

Etna volcano (Italy): intense strombolian activity

So, 20. Sep 2020, 08:11
08:11 AM | VON: T
Strombolian eruption from the New SE crater of Etna volcano this morning (Image: LAVE webcam)
Strombolian eruption from the New SE crater of Etna volcano this morning (Image: LAVE webcam)
The activity of the volcano continues with little changes, characterized by mild to moderate, near continuous strombolian explosions from the saddle vent of the New SE crater.
Some of the eruptions throw incandescent lava bombs onto the upper outer slopes of the crater.

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): near-constant strombolian activity continues

So, 30. Aug 2020, 14:25
14:25 PM | VON: MARTIN
Eruption from Etna volcano on 29 August (image: @yllep2/twitter)
Eruption from Etna volcano on 29 August (image: @yllep2/twitter)
INGV reported that near-constant strombolian activity from the saddle vent of the New SE crater continues.
On 28 August the volcano observatory recorded explosion that generated moderate content of grey ash emissions which increased at 11:30 local time and produced ash column with altitude of 14,763 ft (4,500 m) extending to the E-NE of the volcano. The eruptive event ceased at 14:55 local time.
Fluctuating seismicity continues including periods of average amplitude tremor. The seismic station records internal tremor at 2900-3000 m altitude in area of New SE Crater.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 30 August 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): fluctuating activity continues

Mi, 26. Aug 2020, 07:11
07:11 AM | VON: MARTIN
Emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: @gio_marchese/twitter)
Emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: @gio_marchese/twitter)
Moderate thermal anomaly at Etna volcano detected yesterday (image: MIROVA)
Moderate thermal anomaly at Etna volcano detected yesterday (image: MIROVA)
Strombolian activity continues at fluctuating intensity from the saddle vent of the New SE crater characterized by occasional ash emissions.
An explosion occurred at 15:30 local time yesterday that generated plume of ash which reached approx. 14,763 ft (4,500 m) altitude and drifted SE. Ash fall was reported in Viagrande and Trecastagni areas.
Fluctuating seismicity continues including periods of average amplitude tremor. The seismic station records internal tremor at 2900-3000 m altitude in area of New SE Crater.
According to MIROVA Detection System a moderate thermal anomaly (59 MW) was detected in satellite images.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 26 August 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): long phase of ash emissions

Fr, 21. Aug 2020, 08:46
08:46 AM | VON: MARTIN
Explosion from Etna volcano yesterday (image: INGV)
Explosion from Etna volcano yesterday (image: INGV)
An ash plume from Etna volcano yesterday (image: INGV)
An ash plume from Etna volcano yesterday (image: INGV)
The activity of the volcano remains unchanged.
According to volcano observatory INGV a long phase of strombolian activity began on 20 August characterized by ash emissions from the saddle vent of the New SE crater.
An ash plume extended to the south-southeast of the volcano and caused light ash fall towards the Catania direction. The emissions ceased late evening.
On 21 August another series of strombolian activity with minor ash content was detected.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 21 August 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): increasing activity continues

Mo, 17. Aug 2020, 08:16
08:16 AM | VON: MARTIN
An ash plume rising from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
An ash plume rising from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Extending ash plume from Etna volcano on 14 August (image: INGV)
Extending ash plume from Etna volcano on 14 August (image: INGV)
Increasing strombolian activity continues at the saddle vent of the New SE crater.
On 14 August at 10:49 local time strombolian explosions produced a dark ash plumes which fluctuated a lot in frequency of explosions. The plume containing moderate amount of ash extended to the south-southeast of the volcano. Ashfall was reported in the area of Pedara, Trecastagni and Viagrande.
Seismicity remains at fluctuating levels associated with periods of increasing and decreasing tremor. The seismic station records internal tremor at 2900-3000 m altitude in area of New Southeast Crater.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 17 August 2020

Etna volcano (Italy): spectacular strombolian activity

Di, 11. Aug 2020, 07:40
07:40 AM | VON: T
Strombolian explosions from Etna's New SE crater (image: Giuseppe Tonzuso / facebook)
Strombolian explosions from Etna's New SE crater (image: Giuseppe Tonzuso / facebook)
The activity seen from the INGV webcam on Montagnola
The activity seen from the INGV webcam on Montagnola
Beautiful strombolian activity continues at the saddle vent of the New SE crater. Throughout the night, explosions have been near-continuous, often throwing incandescent lava bombs on the outside flanks of the crater cone.
There is a slightly increasing tendency of activity overall.
An ash and steam plume is rising approx. 3-500 m above the vent. Also, intense degassing continues to take place from the Voragine and Bocca Nuova summit craters.
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Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): increasing strombolian activity

Sa, 1. Aug 2020, 15:19
15:19 PM | VON: MARTIN
Strombolian activity at the New Southeast Crater on 30 July (image: INGV)
Strombolian activity at the New Southeast Crater on 30 July (image: INGV)
INGV reported that the strombolian activity at the New South Crater has been increasing.
Ash plumes reached 14,763 ft (4,500 m) altitude and drifted SW.
Strombolian activity continues at Voragine Crater with minor ash emissions.
Seismicity remains at fluctuating levels associated with periods of increasing and decreasing tremor.
The seismic station records internal tremor at 2900-3000 m altitude in area of New Southeast Crater.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 1 August 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): weak to intermittent strombolian activity continues

Mo, 27. Jul 2020, 07:14
07:14 AM | VON: MARTIN
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano on 25 July (image: INGV)
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano on 25 July (image: INGV)
Emissions of ash rising from Etna volcano on 24 July (image: INGV)
Emissions of ash rising from Etna volcano on 24 July (image: INGV)
INGV reported that explosive activity at the volcano producing ash emissions and weak to intermittent strombolian-type explosions at regular intervals of 1 to 3 per day. Explosions are generated from Saddle vent located between the old and new cones of the Southeast crater.
The seismic station records internal tremor at 2900-3000 m altitude in area of New Southeast Crater.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 27 July 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): weak strombolian activity continues

So, 12. Jul 2020, 11:27
11:27 AM | VON: MARTIN
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Strombolian activity from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
INGV reported that the seismic station records decreasing tremor (8 July at 22:00 local time) associated with mild strombolian explosions (11 July) from the "saddle vent" located between the old and new cones of the Southeast Crater.
The tremor were located at depths between 300 and 400 m beneath New Southeast Crater.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 12 July 2020

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy): explosions from two craters

Fr, 22. Mai 2020, 08:31
08:31 AM | VON: MARTIN
Explosion from Etna volcano today (image: INGV)
Explosion from Etna volcano today (image: INGV)
An ash plume rising from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
An ash plume rising from Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Glow from Etna volcano tonight (image: INGV)
Glow from Etna volcano tonight (image: INGV)
INGV recorded explosions due to ongoing strombolian activity from the summit craters.
Today at 06:05 local time an eruption at New Southeast Crater generated an ash plume, which reached approx. 14,700 ft (4,500 m) altitude and drifted SW.
Explosive activity also continues at Voragine crater. Increasingly ash plumes were dispersed near the summit.
Seismicity remained elevated including periods of increased amplitude tremor located beneath the New SE Crater.
Ground deformation shows no significant impulsive variations associated with the ongoing activity.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 22 May 2020

Etna volcano (Italy): eruption from New SE crater

Mi, 20. Mai 2020, 07:16
07:16 AM | VON: MARTIN
Eruption from Etna volcano on 19 May (image: INGV)
Eruption from Etna volcano on 19 May (image: INGV)
Thermal image of Etna volcano (image: INGV)
Thermal image of Etna volcano (image: INGV)
On 19 May at 12:12 local time INGVvulcani recorded strombolian explosions from the New Southeast Crater, which quickly become stronger and generated a dense dark ash plume. The plumes were dispersed towards the northeast direction.
At 11:20 local time an increase of volcanic tremor has been recorded which was located beneath the New SE Crater at approx. 2,900 m altitude.
Ground deformation shows no significant impulsive variations associated with the ongoing activity.
Source: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo volcano activity update 20 May 2020

Etna volcano (Italy): increasing tremor, alert level raised to orange

Mi, 13. Mai 2020, 10:05
10:05 AM | VON: T
Ash emission from Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Ash emission from Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Strombolian eruption from Etna's New SE crater on 11 May (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Strombolian eruption from Etna's New SE crater on 11 May (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Tremor signal from Etna (image: INGV Catania)
Tremor signal from Etna (image: INGV Catania)
The alert level for the volcano was raised to "orange", as an increase of volcanic tremor has been recorded. This could precede another upcoming phase of more vigorous activity, which remains to be seen, but it suggests that a new batch of magma could be rising inside the volcano's conduits.
In the last days, the intermittent strombolian activity from the New SE crater and the new cone in the summit crater Voragine had been decreasing significantly and become very sporadic.
Today, weak to moderate steam and ash emissions have been occurring from the New Southeast Crater, creating small plumes that were quickly dispersed eastwards by strong winds. The volcanologists only observed sporadic events.

Etna volcano (Italy): strombolian activity from two craters

Mo, 4. Mai 2020, 08:17
08:17 AM | VON: T
Strombolian activity from both Voragina (l) and New SE crater yesterday morning (image: INGV webcam)
Strombolian activity from both Voragina (l) and New SE crater yesterday morning (image: INGV webcam)
The activity of the volcano continues with little changes, characterized by mild to strong strombolian activity from both the New SE crater's main vent and the new intra-crater cone in the Voragine central crater.
The latter has been intermittent, but often producing relatively strong explosions, with incandescent bombs thrown to several hundred meters height and landing on the outer slopes of the central crater.
In contrast, strombolian activity at the New SE crater has been mostly mild only, but fluctuated a lot in frequency of explosions. During the night 2-3 May, they seemed to have been near-continuous, but as of today, are occurring again more intermittently. Tremor has not shown significant variations.

Etna volcano (Italy): eruption from New SE crater, 1 km ash plume

So, 19. Apr 2020, 19:00
19:00 PM | VON: T
Eruption of Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Eruption of Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Therrmal image showing hot tephra covering the NSEC (image: INGV thermal webcam)
Therrmal image showing hot tephra covering the NSEC (image: INGV thermal webcam)
A brief, but intense episode of explosive activity took place at Etna's SE crater this morning. Starting in the early morning hours, from around 07:30 local time, the New Southeast Crater began to produce strombolian-type explosions along with a sharp increase in volcanic tremor.
Activity rapidly increased in intensity, producing a weak lava fountain and an ash column that rose approx. 1 km. Incandescent lava covered most of the New SE crater, but no lava flow was produced.
Video of the eruption:

The eruption (or better eruptive episode) quickly faded again at around noon. It was similar (but much weaker) than the numerous paroxysms from the cone that had built if, mainly during the series of powerful paroxysms during 2011-12, but as well numerous weaker episodes of fountaining and intense strombolian activity that occurred intermittently during the past years.
The strombolian activity from the new cone growing inside the central crater (Voragine), which has been going on for about half a year seems to have not been affected, and continues with little variation. However, the lava flow from the cone which had been active during the past months, partially filling the neighboring Bocca Nuova crater, was no longer active when volcanologists visited the crater area a few days ago.

Etna volcano (Italy): continuing strombolian activity from Voragine summit crater, intra-crater lava flow

So, 9. Feb 2020, 18:47
18:47 PM | VON: T
Strombolian activity and intra-crater lava flow from Etna's Voragine (image: M Rietze)
Strombolian activity and intra-crater lava flow from Etna's Voragine (image: M Rietze)
Explosive-effusive activity continues from the new cinder cone vent in the Voragine summit crater.
Our friend Martin Rietze visited the volcano during the past days and observed: "... ongoing activity from the new Voragine crater, producing a lava flow into Bocca Nova crater depression. Nearly permanent strombolian activity with sometimes (all 20min roughly) bigger explosions, accompanied by shock waves and up to 300m high, maybe more."

Etna volcano (Italy): impressive strombolian activity from Voragine summit crater

Sa, 1. Feb 2020, 09:44
09:44 AM | VON: T
Strombolian eruption from Etna's Voragine yesterday evening (image: Francesco Tomarchio / facebook)
Strombolian eruption from Etna's Voragine yesterday evening (image: Francesco Tomarchio / facebook)
Current tremor signal ECPN station (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal ECPN station (image: INGV Catania)
Mild to moderate summit activity continues at the volcano. In particular, the strombolian activity from the intra-crater cone inside the Voragine (Central) summit crater, has resumed during the past days and sometimes produces impressive fireworks of incandescent lava being thrown much higher than the crater rim.
This activity had started on 12 Sep and over the months constructed a new cinder cone growing inside the crater.
At the moment, this activity seems to be stable; there are no significant variations in volcanic tremor suggesting that it might cease or increase soon, although rapid changes at Etna's summit craters are not rare. The situation remains to be followed.
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Etna volcano (Italy): strombolian activity from New SE craterr continues

Do, 12. Dez 2019, 09:24
09:24 AM | VON: T
Strombolian explosion at Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Strombolian explosion at Etna's New SE crater this morning (image: INGV Catania webcam)
The activity at the volcano continues with little variation: mild to moderate strombolian explosions are occurring at the New SE crater's summit vent.
Activity in the Bocca Nuova and Voragine summit craters seems to have decreased, but probably continues as well.

Etna volcano (Italy): increasing activity, strombolian explosions from at least 3 vents in summit area

Sa, 7. Dez 2019, 15:59
15:59 PM | VON: T
Etna volcano with strombolian activity at the Voragine (l) and New SE crater (r) this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Etna volcano with strombolian activity at the Voragine (l) and New SE crater (r) this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Current tremor signal (image: INGV Catania)
Activity at the volcano has increased during the past 24 hours. Mild to moderate strombolian activity resumed at the New SE crater's summit vent and has been intensifying.
The activity at the New SE crater began yesterday at about 16:00 UTC (17:00 local time), ejecting plenty of incandescent lava bombs onto the outer flanks of the cone.
At the same time, the mild strombolian activity from vents inside the Bocca Nuova and Voragine summit craters continues at similar intensity as during the previous weeks. An intracrater lava flow produced by this activity was seen active on some photos published on social media.
Tremor has increased a bit, but shows no significant variations at the time of this update.

Etna volcano (Italy): strombolian activity at Central Crater continues

Sa, 5. Okt 2019, 07:45
07:45 AM | VON: T
Ash puff from Etna's Central Crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Ash puff from Etna's Central Crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Thermal image of the same explosion (image: INGV thermal webcam)
Thermal image of the same explosion (image: INGV thermal webcam)
Activity at the volcano's summit continues with little changes: the new intra-crater cone inside Voragina (Central Crater) produces strombolian explosions with ejections of lava bombs and small ash puffs occasionally seen on the webcam.
Team member Marco Fulle visited the volcano recently during one of ours "Volcano Special" tours and observed that bombs ejected from the cone sometimes reach Bocca Nuova crater. Access to the summit craters is currently closed.

Etna volcano (Italy): vigorous summit activity, alert level temporarily raised to red

Mi, 2. Okt 2019, 09:30
09:30 AM | VON: T
Ash emission from Etna's central crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Ash emission from Etna's central crater this morning (image: INGV webcam)
Activity from 3 craters (l-r): strong emissions from NE crater, ash puff from Voragine and a weaker ash plume from Bocca Nuova
Activity from 3 craters (l-r): strong emissions from NE crater, ash puff from Voragine and a weaker ash plume from Bocca Nuova
The vigorous activity at the summit craters of the volcano continuous. An increase in ash emissions from the Central (Voragine), Northeast and (to lesser extent) Bocca Nuova craters triggered a temporary raise of the aviation alert level to RED yesterday.
Today, emissions have decreased again and the alert level was lowered to ORANGE.
Eruptive activity continues at similar levels: vigorous strombolian activity in the Central crater continues to build a new intra-crater cinder cone, generating typically smaller puffs of ash. Stronger ash explosions and passive emissions occur from the NE and Bocca Nuova craters.
Beautiful aerial photos showing the current activity (in particular the intra-crater cone in Voragine) can be found on social media, for example:

Etna volcano (Italy): ash emissions from NE crater cease, volcano currently calm

Mo, 26. Aug 2019, 07:08
07:08 AM | VON: T
Etna volcano this morning (image: guidetna.it webcam)
Etna volcano this morning (image: guidetna.it webcam)
The volcano observatory (INGV Catania) announced that the intermittent ash emissions from the NE crater, which had been occurring at fluctuating intensity during the past few days ceased yesterday morning. No new emissions were observed after 08:38 local time.
Currently, the volcano seems to be relatively quiet (something that can change very quickly, though). Average seismic activity, ground deformation, and thermal signals are low. Only dense steam plumes are currently rising from the summit craters, mostly Bocca Nuova and SE crater complex.

Etna volcano (Italy): ash emissions from NE crater

Do, 15. Aug 2019, 17:06
17:06 PM | VON: T
Ash emission from Etna's NE crater this morning (image: guidetna.it webcam)
Ash emission from Etna's NE crater this morning (image: guidetna.it webcam)
Ash emissions occurred this morning from the northeast crater. It seems that the ash, brownish in color, was cold and composed of older material, likely from internal collapses in the crater (a portion of the crater rim had collapsed a few days ago).
There is currently no eruptive activity at the volcano involving fresh lava and monitoring signals do not suggest an immediate change likely; only a weak thermal anomaly continues to be present from the southeast crater complex.
Of course, this can change very quickly, particularly at a volcano as active as Etna.

Etna volcano (Italy): summit area open for excursions again

Mi, 14. Aug 2019, 19:56
19:56 PM | VON: T
Satellite image of Etna volcano today
Satellite image of Etna volcano today
The summit area of the volcano has been reopened for excursions with authorized mountain guides today.

Etna volcano (Italy) activity update: weak ash emissions from Central summit crater

Sa, 22. Jun 2019, 14:12
14:12 PM | VON: T
Ash emission from Etna's Voragine summit crater this afternoon (image: INGV Catania)
Ash emission from Etna's Voragine summit crater this afternoon (image: INGV Catania)
The volcano observatory (INGV Catania) reported that after a pause in explosive activity from its summit crater, weak intermittent ash emissions have resumed this morning.
This weak activity originates from Etna's Voragine and possibly also the Bocca Nuova summit craters. No other monitoring parameters currently suggest an increase of activity in the near future.

Etna volcano (Italy) activity update: ash emissions from central summit crater

Fr, 14. Jun 2019, 10:14
10:14 AM | VON: T
Ash emissions from Etna's Voragine on 13 June evening (image: INGVvulcani / facebook)
Ash emissions from Etna's Voragine on 13 June evening (image: INGVvulcani / facebook)
After the recent, short-lived subterminal eruption ended last week, the volcano remains restless.
Dense and relatively intense ash emissions are occurring from the central summit crater (Voragine).
INGV Catania wrote about this activity: "It is coughing since the early afternoon of 13 June 2019, after more than three years of relative calm. As we have already seen in the videos published yesterday on this page, the emissions are occurring from a new vent in the northwestern inner wall of the crater.
This vent is distinct from the collapse pits that had opened in August 2016 and between January and April 2019 in the eastern and northern inner walls of the crater."
A video can be found on our facebook group.
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Links / Quelle:

Etna volcano (Italy) eruption update: eruption is probably ending

Mo, 3. Jun 2019, 18:21
18:21 PM | VON: T
Thermal image of Etna's SE crater showing no signs of still active lava effusion (image: INGV Catania)
Thermal image of Etna's SE crater showing no signs of still active lava effusion (image: INGV Catania)
Thermal image of Etna's SE crater seen from the east yesterday showing the active flow on the southern side (image: INGV Catania)
Thermal image of Etna's SE crater seen from the east yesterday showing the active flow on the southern side (image: INGV Catania)
The recent sub-terminal eruption of Etna, which started early on 30 May, is probably ending or has ended already. During the past 24 hours, lava emission gradually decreased.
While the southeastern lava flow was still active this morning, lava effusion appears now to have ceased or at least decreased to a fraction of its initial output. The lava flow on the NE side already stopped yesterday.

Etna volcano (Italy) eruption update: lava flows travel into Valle del Bove

Fr, 31. Mai 2019, 07:20
07:20 AM | VON: T
The active lava flows on Etna volcano seen last evening from the east side (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
The active lava flows on Etna volcano seen last evening from the east side (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
The eruption which began in the early hours of 30 May 2019 from new fissure vents on both the NE and SE sides of the New Southeast Crater continues with little change.
Two lava lava flows, well fed, are moving into the Valle del Bove accompanied by loud strombolian activity at the vents.
Here's a video our local tour manager and coordinator Emanuela took yesterday morning:


Different from the Dec 2018 eruption, no significant earthquake activity has so far occurred along with the eruption.

Etna volcano (Italy): continuing ash emissions

Mo, 18. Feb 2019, 10:57
10:57 AM | VON: T
Etna erupting ash from NE crater as seen last evening from Lipari (!) during extremely clear weather (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Etna erupting ash from NE crater as seen last evening from Lipari (!) during extremely clear weather (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
For more than a month, sometimes intense ash emissions have been taking place from the NE crater and, to lesser extent, from Bocca Nuova.
These ashes are currently believed not to be formed by fresh magma rising in the conduits, but instead are composed of older material that is now being vented from the inner conduits. It can be interpreted as the surface expression of internal re-adjustments that followed the brief, but intense eruption at Christmas last year, which drained (some of the) magma from the conduits and reservoirs.
Another factor are likely the seismic events around the volcano in the days and weeks after, which also might have caused internal shifts in magma storage.

Etna volcano (Italy): shallow magnitude 4.1 earthquake under NE rift zone

Mi, 9. Jan 2019, 08:51
08:51 AM | VON: T
Seismic signal of this night's quake under Etna (image: INGV Catania)
Seismic signal of this night's quake under Etna (image: INGV Catania)
Location of the earthquake
Location of the earthquake
The volcano remains restless in form of earthquakes. A magnitude 4.1 earthquake at 2 km depth beneath the northeastern rift zone occurred early this morning at 00:50 am.
Some residents in the area, e.g. from Linguaglossa town reported to have been woken up by the tremor (detail info for this earthquake).
Whether the earthquake is caused by magma intrusion in this area prone to flank eruptions or of other origin (tectonic adjustment of the east flank) is unclear.

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) activity update: small ash emissions from NE crater

Mo, 7. Jan 2019, 10:53
10:53 AM | VON: T
Ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
After several days of bad, unusually cold weather (and heavy snowfalls on the upper flanks), Etna has again been visible in its splendor since yesterday morning.
Volcanologist Boris Behncke (INGV Catania) observed small, dilute ash emissions from the NE crater, which occurred at short intervals and caused small peaks in seismic activity.
Other than that, the volcano has continued to calm down overall, but this can of course change rapidly.
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Etna volcano (Italy): earthquakes under SW flank

Fr, 4. Jan 2019, 09:39
09:39 AM | VON: T
Recent earthquakes under Mt Etna volcano
Recent earthquakes under Mt Etna volcano
The volcano continues to show signs of unrest. A swarm of shallow small earthquakes has been occurring under the SW flank during the past days and seems to be increasing.
The strongest shock so far was a magnitude 3.5 event at very shallow depth 7 km north of Ragalna about 5 hours ago (at 06:10 am local time), felt as weak shaking in the villages on Etna's southern and western flanks.
Whether these quakes are related to possible magma intrusions under the western rift zone can be speculated about.
At the surface, the volcano seems rather quiet and bad weather currently prevents detailed visual observation.

Etna volcano (Italy): satellite data reveal part of the volcano has moved by 50 cm during 24-26 Dec 2018

Mi, 2. Jan 2019, 11:44
11:44 AM | VON: T
Maps showing the displacements during the 24-26 Dec eruption and seismic crisis (image: CNR)
Maps showing the displacements during the 24-26 Dec eruption and seismic crisis (image: CNR)
Italian scientists have analyzed satellite data from the Italian Cosmo-SkyMed and the European Sentinel satellites, which passed over Etna both before and after the short, but intense flank eruption that began on 24 December 2018 and the seismic crisis that accompanied this event and culminated in the 4.8 magnitude early on 26 Dec with an epicenter near the villages Viagrande, Trecastagni and Fleri on the southeastern side of Etna.
Comparing the data, they were able to calculate how the shape of the volcano changed due to the intrusion of the magma, which in parts rose to the surface through the new eruptive fissures, and in parts became "stuck" as shallow and deeper intrusions. The results are stunning:
- the western slope of Etna has moved 30 centimeters to the west (in red on the map, figure c);
- the eastern slope moved 50 centimeters to the east (in blue on the map, figure c).
The star at the bottom right indicates the epicenter of mentioned strongest quake.
The main fault involved was the so-called Fiandaca fault, where the earth's crust has moved eastwards by 12-14 centimeters and westwards by 15-17 centimeters. Other faults were also involved in the swarm, but more indirectly, as reactions to the main movement on the Fiandaca fault: the of Pernicanca fault (on the north-eastern side) moved 3 centimeters, the Ragalna fault (south-west slope) and that of Borello-Ognina (south slope) of 2 centimeters.
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Links / Quelle:

Etna volcano (Italy): volcano remains restless as small earthquakes and steam emissions continue

So, 30. Dez 2018, 19:26
19:26 PM | VON: T
Ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Location of recent earthquakes under Mt Etna volcano during the past 7 days (red: past 48 hours)
Location of recent earthquakes under Mt Etna volcano during the past 7 days (red: past 48 hours)
Steam and ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Steam and ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Steam and ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Steam and ash emissions from Etna volcano yesterday (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
The volcano remains highly restless. Although no more lava is being erupted right now, strong gas and dense ash emissions continue from the Bocca Nuova crater as a sign that magma is close to the surface.
Seismic activity as well remains elevated. Today, a cluster of small earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (1-8 km) beneath the SW flank, which could indicate another intrusion beneath that area. The largest was a magnitude 3.4 event at 19:30 local time, felt by some residents nearby.

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) activity update

Mo, 24. Dez 2018, 17:54
17:54 PM | VON: T
Eruption of new lava flow from Etna this afternoon (image: LAVE webcam)
Eruption of new lava flow from Etna this afternoon (image: LAVE webcam)
The following video shows the beginning of Etna volcano's new flank eruption, starting around noon on 24 Dec 2018: a series of quakes accompanies the progressive opening of several fractures, accompanied by strong ash emission, on and below the SE crater.
An eruptive fissure opens around 17:00 local time in the upper western headwall of the Valle del Bove, followed by a river of lava descending from there and quickly reaching the bottom of it:

Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) activity update: subterminal flank eruption

Mo, 24. Dez 2018, 13:30
13:30 PM | VON: T
View from Catania showing the ash plume from the ongoing eruption (image: Etna Tech webcam 1)
View from Catania showing the ash plume from the ongoing eruption (image: Etna Tech webcam 1)
Thermal image of the new lava flow in the upper Valle del Bove on Etna's eastern flank (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Thermal image of the new lava flow in the upper Valle del Bove on Etna's eastern flank (image: INGV Catania webcam)
Current seismic signal from ESVO station (image: INGV Catania)
Current seismic signal from ESVO station (image: INGV Catania)
The volcano decided to begin a subterminal flank eruption, i.e. effusion of lava from a flank vent connected to the upper conduits in the summit area.
Currently, a large lava flow is currently running into the upper Valle del Bove from a new fissure vent at the southeastern feet of the New SE crater, near the former Belvedere area.
Whether this develops further into a true flank eruption is still unclear. Seismic activity is elevated; our correspondent on location could feel the earth share violently beneath her feet. Tremor is still high, which could indicate that the fractures are still propagating, although seems to be decreasing already. Right now, the eruption poses no danger.

Etna's way to celebrate Christmas is certainly interesting!

Etna volcano (Italy): eruption intensifies, possibly heading towards a paroxysm

Mo, 24. Dez 2018, 11:49
11:49 AM | VON: T
Strombolian activity from Etna's New SE crater last night (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Strombolian activity from Etna's New SE crater last night (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Strong ash emissions from the New SE crater now (image: INGV Catania)
Strong ash emissions from the New SE crater now (image: INGV Catania)
Seismic signal (ECNE station, INGV Catania)
Seismic signal (ECNE station, INGV Catania)
[UPDATE]
A significant event is in progress at the volcano. Strong seismic activity, felt by people, has been accompanying the opening of several fractures in the summit area, most notably on the eastern and southern flanks of the New SE crater, which is emitting dense ash plumes.
The activity of the volcano is increasing and looks as if going towards a paroxysm.
Strombolian activity from the New SE crater has intensified, and currently strong ash emissions are visible, suggesting pulsating lava fountaining.
Our local correspondents reported a seismic swarm was detected and tremor is also rising. They are on their way towards the mountain and we will probably be able to send a more detailed report later. In the meanwhile, you can look at the evolving eruption webcams online.
Activity decreases
Update Mon 14 Dec 2020 07:16
Etna with strombolian activity from New SE crater and the new lava flow early this motning (image: INGV webcam)
Etna with strombolian activity from New SE crater and the new lava flow early this motning (image: INGV webcam)
The volcano this morning with NSEC still emitting light ash plumes and the lava flow now probably no more alimentated (image: INGV webcam)
The volcano this morning with NSEC still emitting light ash plumes and the lava flow now probably no more alimentated (image: INGV webcam)
Tremor signal ECME station (INGV Catania)
Tremor signal ECME station (INGV Catania)
During the early morning hours, the intense explosive-effusive activity that had started last night from the New SE summit crater decreased significantly.
Clearer pictures from this morning show that the protangonist of this eruptive episode was mainly the summit vent of the SE crater complex as well as what seems to be a fissure on its southern flank, emitting the new lava flow that has reached approx. 2700 m elevation and traveled west of the 2002 craters.
Ash emissions and strombolian activity continue at the summit vent, but at much lesser intensity than last night. Tremor has decreased, but remains well above the previous average levels confirming that activity continues at reduced rate.

New eruption early this morning

Update Thu 30 May 2019 07:20
Lava flow from Etna volcano's New SE crater this morning (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Lava flow from Etna volcano's New SE crater this morning (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Tremor amplitude (image: INGV Catania)
Tremor amplitude (image: INGV Catania)
A new eruption started overnight: around 3 am local time, a small effusive fissure opened on the south-south-eastern base of the New SE crater and generated a small lava flow which is still active now.
Another lava flow originated from a vent on the SE side on the same cone, near the area where the eruption in Dec 2018 had started.
Seismic activity started to rise last evening, peaked around midnight, then decreased a bit, but has been more or less stable since.
Continuing ash emissions from Bocca Nuova and NE crater
Update Tue 29 Jan 2019 13:43
Ash emissions from Etna this morning from Bocca Nuova visible in backgroun, with the SE crater in front (image: LAVE webcam)
Ash emissions from Etna this morning from Bocca Nuova visible in backgroun, with the SE crater in front (image: LAVE webcam)
The activity at the volcano continues with pulsating, often strong ash emissions from the NE and Bocca Nuova craters at intervals of few minutes.
However, seismic activity remains low and there are currently no indications that these ash emissions (even though they are quite spectacular sometimes) are caused by fresh magma rising and might herald possible new activity in the near future.
More likely, they reflect internal adjustments of the conduits and internal reservoirs still drained by the flank eruption on Christmas 2018 (i.e. the ashes could be largely from fragmented older material).
Ash emissions from NE crater
Update Wed 23 Jan 2019 20:37
Aerial view of Etna on 22 Jan 2019 showing the ash plume from the NE crater, view from the west
Aerial view of Etna on 22 Jan 2019 showing the ash plume from the NE crater, view from the west
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during the past 7 days
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during the past 7 days
Heat emission from Etna during the past weeks (image: Modis / MIROVA)
Heat emission from Etna during the past weeks (image: Modis / MIROVA)
The volcano continues to be restless, although it has been calming down overall during the past weeks. Small earthquakes, although less in numbers and size (rarely exceeding magnitude 2) continue to occur in clusters under the western, southern and eastern flanks.
On the surface, the NE crater has been producing dense (but rather cold) ash emissions that form a sometimes impressive plume drifting from the summit area.

Decreasing activity for now, but this could change soon

Update Thu 27 Dec 2018 17:06
Tall steam and ash plume rising from Etna's Bocca Nuova (GuidEtna webcam)crater
Tall steam and ash plume rising from Etna's Bocca Nuova (GuidEtna webcam)crater
Current tremor amplitude showing a gradual decrease
Current tremor amplitude showing a gradual decrease
Aerial view of the western headwall of Valle del Bove and crater area from the east, showing the now almost inactive eruptive fissure from the 24 Dec eruption (image: INGV)
Aerial view of the western headwall of Valle del Bove and crater area from the east, showing the now almost inactive eruptive fissure from the 24 Dec eruption (image: INGV)
Map of earthquakes around Etna during 24-26 Dec 2018, the M4.8 event from 03:19 on 26 Dec marked in blue (image: INGV)
Map of earthquakes around Etna during 24-26 Dec 2018, the M4.8 event from 03:19 on 26 Dec marked in blue (image: INGV)
The decreasing trend in surface and earthquake activity on and around Etna continues and there is little to nothing left of the vigorous flank eruption that had started on Christmas Eve (24 Dec 2018). However, the volcano is far from quiet and there are indications that more and potentially more dangerous activity could be in the making.

A tell-tale sign that the flank eruption could only be a prelude is that magma continues to stand high inside the volcano's conduit: glow and intense gas and steam emissions are visible from the Bocca Nuova, producing a tall plume rising vertically into the evening sky. The recent eruption has drained only very little of the available magma. Will more come out soon?

Eugenio Priviera, director of INGV (the National Institute of Geology and Volcanology) mentioned in an interview quoted in a Sicilian newspaper that new eruptive fissures could open up even at lower altitudes. INGV posted a special report about the current situation and the recent earthquakes on its blog site:
Even though the current surface phenomena are weakening, the general decrease in eruptive activity could be misleading: information obtained from geophysical cannot exclude that magma supply into the same dike that fed the recent eruption is still in progress, and could open its way with new fissures down to altitudes beneath 2,400 m, especially in the area of the southern and western walls of Valle del Bove.

In the newspaper article mentioned, Priviera explains that one area particularly at risk for this could be the area of ​​Piano del Vescovo south of Valle del Bove in the SE sector of Etna. Whether this will happen or not cannot be predicted. According to the newspaper, Priviera said that the recent earthquakes have shown that the known Fiandaca fault was activated, which is a potentially dangerous situation. He announced that ground deformation monitoring is being intensified in the area.

Yesterday's destructive M4.8 earthquake that hit the lower SE flank of Etna t 03:19 local time (26 Dec) occurred 1 km S of Lavinaio (CT) village and caused lots of damage to houses and buildings. Its depth was localized to be at only 1 km below sea level (i.e. approx. 1500 m below the surface).
The quake coincided with the 3rd day of the eruption of Etna. INGV writes that "it should be noted that the earthquake was not generated by movements of magma masses present in the epicentral area, but probably was the response of the eastern flank of the volcano to a stress induced by the magmatic system that at that time fed the eruption."
In other words, the pressure induced by rising magma in the central conduit might have been the trigger to activate the fault lines on the eastern flank, but are likely not a sign that magma was intruding in the same area of the quake (at the lower eastern flank).
Eruption update - continuing earthquake swarm
Update Tue 25 Dec 2018 18:09
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during the past 7 days
Earthquakes under Etna volcano during the past 7 days
Thermal image of Etna this evening seen from the west (image: INGV thermal webcam in Bronte)
Thermal image of Etna this evening seen from the west (image: INGV thermal webcam in Bronte)
An impression from what it looked like yesterday when Barbara, a friend of ours from Stromboli, was en route from Catania to Milazzo, passing the ash plume (image: Barbara Engele)
An impression from what it looked like yesterday when Barbara, a friend of ours from Stromboli, was en route from Catania to Milazzo, passing the ash plume (image: Barbara Engele)
Bad weather has mostly prevented clear sights of the new flank eruption today, but it seems that while it is still going on, lava emission from the new fissure vent high in the Valle del Bove that opened yesterday has decreased.
The area remains obscured in clouds, but thermal cameras show continuing activity from the Bocca Nuova.
Seismic activity remains elevated, showing that the eruption is certainly not over and still evolving: the recent earthquake swarm continues (albeit at decreased intensity) with approx. 20 earthquakes with magnitudes between 2 and 3.4 having been detected during the past 24 hours. Most quakes were at shallow depth in the SE sector of the volcano.
First images / videos from the new eruption
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 23:11
Ash emissions from Etna at the onset of the eruption (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Ash emissions from Etna at the onset of the eruption (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Our Etna specialist Emanuela climbed Etna earlier today, witnessing the onset of the new flank eruption in the upper Valle del Bove.
You can find the images in this gallery.
Video from the beginning of the eruption:

Video compilation showing the ash emissions and the lava flow from the new fissure vent:

Magnitude 4.5 earthquake
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 17:01
A magnitude 4.5 quake occurred a few minutes ago near Etna. The eruption is still evolving fast.
Link to earthquake information
Flank eruption confirmed from new fissure in upper Valle del Bove
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 16:53
The new lava flow at Etna (image: LAVE webcam)
The new lava flow at Etna (image: LAVE webcam)
Beginning of darkness makes it easier to see what is going on: a flank eruption in from the a new effusive vent in the upper western headwall of the Valle del Bove, SE of the SE crater.
The lava flow has already reached and is spreading in the Valle del Bove itself. For now, it does not pose any danger.
Eruption visible from satellite
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 16:37
Today's Aqua satellite image of Etna volcano
Today's Aqua satellite image of Etna volcano
The strong ash emissions can also be seen on satellite images - impressive!
Magnitude 4 earthquake hits Etna's east flank
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 16:18
Location of the magnitude 4 quake earlier today under Etna volcano
Location of the magnitude 4 quake earlier today under Etna volcano
Seismic activity at Etna is significant. The largest quake today so far has been a magnitude 4 quake at 2 km depth under the SE flank. It occurred at 13:09 local time and was widely felt around in the area.
It was most certainly associated with the opening of the new eruptive fissure below the SE crater.
Strong lava flow from fracture at eastern base of SE crater
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 12:46
Lava flow from eastern foot of New SE crater into Valle del Bove (INGV thermal webcam on Monte Cagliato, looking from the east towards the upper Valle del Bove))
Lava flow from eastern foot of New SE crater into Valle del Bove (INGV thermal webcam on Monte Cagliato, looking from the east towards the upper Valle del Bove))
From webcam imagery, a strong lava flow seems to be coming from a fracture on the eastern base of the New SE crater, headed into the Valle del Bove (where it poses no threat).
Strong seismic activity
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 12:24
Seismic signal from Etna's ECNE station (INGV Catania)
Seismic signal from Etna's ECNE station (INGV Catania)
Something significant is in progress at Etna:
Emanuela who's on location reported "crazy seismic activity" and that new fractures have opened on the eastern and southern flank of the SE crater (SEC).
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 12:17
Ash emissions on 24 Dec 2018 around noon (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Ash emissions on 24 Dec 2018 around noon (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Ash emissions from Etna's New SE crater on 24 Dec 2018 around noon (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Ash emissions from Etna's New SE crater on 24 Dec 2018 around noon (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Emanuela who's on her way to the volcano sent the above images from the intense activity of ash emissions.
Ongoing eruption seen from the west side
Update Mon 24 Dec 2018 11:57
View of the ongoing activity from Paterno (western side; image: Radio Touring Webcam)
View of the ongoing activity from Paterno (western side; image: Radio Touring Webcam)

Etna volcano (Italy): lava flows and strombolian explosions from SE crater

Do, 13. Dez 2018, 23:51
23:51 PM | VON: T
Lava flows and strombolian activity at Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: Tom Pfeiffer / VolcanoDiscovery)
Lava flows and strombolian activity at Etna's New SE crater this evening (image: Tom Pfeiffer / VolcanoDiscovery)
Mild effusive/explosive activity continues at the eastern vent of the New SE crater, feeding two small lava flows traveling a few hundred meters down the eastern slope of the crater towards the upper Valle del Bove.
The larger and more active flow emerges from the rim of the new cinder cone, while the the smaller one to the south of it is coming from a vent located few meters beneath the crater rim.
While the lava effusion seems to have been more or less stable, strombolian (explosive) activity has been decreasing over the past days. On 9 Dec, it was continuous, as pulsating low fountains, with abundant noise audible in several kilometers distance.
When observed this evening, strombolian explosions were smaller and much more intermittent, and only rarely ejected incandescent material to the outer slopes of the eastern flank of the SE crater complex.

Etna volcano (Italy): activity update - strombolian activity from several summit vents

Di, 2. Okt 2018, 22:30
22:30 PM | VON: T
Ash emission from Etna's NE crater on 30 Sep 2018 (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Ash emission from Etna's NE crater on 30 Sep 2018 (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Map of Etna's summit craters at present (image: INGV)
Map of Etna's summit craters at present (image: INGV)
Strombolian eruption in Bocca Nuova on 30 Sep 2018 (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Strombolian eruption in Bocca Nuova on 30 Sep 2018 (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
A new vent with strong degassing opened in Bocca Nuova a few days ago, discovered on 30 Sep via our guide's infrared camera (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
A new vent with strong degassing opened in Bocca Nuova a few days ago, discovered on 30 Sep via our guide's infrared camera (image: Emanuela Carone / VolcanoDiscovery Italia)
Recent earthquakes under Etna's eastern flank
Recent earthquakes under Etna's eastern flank
Over the past few weeks, Etna has been showing mild, sporadic strombolian activity from 5 of the summit vents: 3 vents inside Bocca Nuova (two in the northwestern and one in its southeastern pits), the NE crater and less frequently from the New SE crater.
The ejection of incandescent bombs rarely reach above and beyond the rims of both Bocca Nuova and NE crater. More or less intense ash emissions, in particular from the NE crater, accompany the activity.
The vent in the upper eastern wall of Voragine (which had formed on 7 Aug 2016) showed a marked increase in degassing activity during the past week.
As a result of the strombolian activity inside Bocca Nuova, a new intra-crater cinder cone has been growing at the bottom of the western pit. During one of our guided tours to the summit last Sunday (30 Sep), mountain guide Francesco Ciancitto could confirm the opening of a new vent inside Bocca Nuova's western pit just next to the actively erupting one. It showed strong degassing; thus, there are currently 4 active vents in Bocca Nuova alone.

Earthquake activity:
Tremor and degassing levels have been low to average according to the latest weekly bulletin of the volcano observatory (INGV Catania). However, it should be noted that a number of volcano-tectonic earthquakes have affected the middle eastern flank recently. The largest events were two quakes of magnitudes 2.9 and 3.5 at depths around 5 km near the Pernicana fault (which often has acted as an "opener" for the NE rift zone in the past). However, there are no signs currently of an impending larger (rift) eruption.
---
Links / Quelle:
Eruption seems to decrease
Update Sat 25 Aug 2018 12:38
The strombolian activity from the SE crater which started Thursday evening is progressively decreasing. From time to time weak ash emissions are still observed. The effusive activity has almost stopped. The seismic tremor is still at an elevated level, but it is also showing a decreasing trend.
Strombolian Activity from the SE crater  (photo: Emanuela / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
Strombolian Activity from the SE crater (photo: Emanuela / VolcanoDiscovery Italy)
New eruptive activity at SE crater
Update Fri 24 Aug 2018 08:46
Strombolian activity from Etna's SE crater last night (LAVE webcam)
Strombolian activity from Etna's SE crater last night (LAVE webcam)
Ash plume from an explosion at the SE crater this morning
Ash plume from an explosion at the SE crater this morning
Last night, new activity started at the SE crater. Tremor began to rise sharply at around 20:30 local time, accompanied by mild strombolian activity from the new cone in the saddle between the "old" and "new" SE crater.
A small lava flow also emerged. The activity continues this morning, sometimes generating ash plumes of several hundred meters height.

Earthquake swarms under eastern and western flanks

Update Mon 28 May 2018 16:47
Recent earthquakes under Etna volcano
Recent earthquakes under Etna volcano
Depth vs time of recent quakes
Depth vs time of recent quakes
Bocca Nuova on 25 May 2018
Bocca Nuova on 25 May 2018
The volcano is becoming increasingly restless. Two earthquake swarms have occurred during the past days:
The first was at medium depths (mostly 10-30 km) beneath the eastern flank during 24-26 May, the second one started yesterday and is still continuing under the western flank at depths around 5-10 km. Both could indicate an intrusion of magma, and tremor levels are slightly elevated. Whether this heralds a new eruption in the near future (days, weeks?) is matter of speculation. So far, the quakes have been relatively weak.

When we visited Bocca Nuova last Saturday, we noticed relatively strong, pulsating gas emissions from not-very-deep seated explosions inside the main western vent. According to the mountain guides, this activity had increased, as well as degassing from some areas at the southern rim of the central crater as well as the NE crater.
Weak ash emissions from SE crater and seismic activity
Update Thu 21 Sep 2017 21:57
Small ash emission from the SE crater
Small ash emission from the SE crater
Since last Monday the SE crater is showing small signs of activity again. During last nights weak sporadic glowes were seen from the depression on the eastern slope of the crater and starting this morning small ash emissions are occurring intermittently from the top of the crater.
Several seismic swarms have been recorded below the southwest slope of Mount Etna since last month. The last swarm occurred on September 18th, close to Mt. Intraleo on the western slope of the volcano. 45 eartquakes were recorded from 04:06 (UTC) to 08:31 (UTC) with magnitudes ranging between M1.0 and M3.3. The strongest earthquake, magnitude M 3.3, took place at 07:21 (UTC) at a depth of 5.5 km. Researchers think this suggests a new phase of deep magmatic recharge is taking place.
Furthermore on August 24 a new eruptive phase began at Salinelle dei Cappuccini with a mud flow that partly invaded the road around the Paternò stadium. The Salinelle dei Cappuccini is one of three mud volcano fields located between the villages of Paternò and Belpasso characterized by persistent emission of mud and gases. It is possible that the recent seismic activity may have modified their level of activity.
Small ash emissions, steam rings, summit access for tours reopened
Update Fri 14 Jul 2017 08:59
Steam ring blown from Etna's Voragine crater this morning (image:Radiostudio7 webcam)
Steam ring blown from Etna's Voragine crater this morning (image:Radiostudio7 webcam)
Bocca Nuova with its collapsing crater floor on 13 July 2017 (image: Gio Giusa / facebook)
Bocca Nuova with its collapsing crater floor on 13 July 2017 (image: Gio Giusa / facebook)
Small ash puff from the SE crater on 9 July (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
Small ash puff from the SE crater on 9 July (image: Boris Behncke / facebook)
The volcano remains restless although no one knows what will come next. After a few weeks of "total silence", tiny ash emissions started again to occur from the SE crater since 9 July, volcanologist Dr Boris Behncke reported on facebook. This activity, which could represent small but deep-seated explosive activity inside the SE crater's conduits, has been continuing over the past days, with a slight increase yesterday (see video below).
Access to the summit craters for tours guided by authorized mountain guides has been allowed again.

Other than that, there is intense degassing from the Voragine summit crater, which sometimes also produces beautiful smoke rings (steam ring vortexes), while the Bocca Nouva's crater floor continues to undergo slow concentric collapse (see images on facebook)


Intermittent ash emissions from SE crater
Update Mon 26 Jun 2017 08:24
Ash puff from Etna's SE crater this morning (image: RadioStudio7)
Ash puff from Etna's SE crater this morning (image: RadioStudio7)
Stronger ash emission yesterday morning (image: RadioStudio7)
Stronger ash emission yesterday morning (image: RadioStudio7)
After a period of calm during the past weeks, the SE crater started again to show signs of unrest. Since yesterday morning, small to moderate ash emissions have been occurring intermittently from the summit vent of the SE crater complex.
Thermal imagery indicates that the ashes are relatively cold, suggesting that the magma column at the moment resides still low in the conduit.
Whether the observed ash puffs are caused by deep-seated explosive activity (=degassing of magma) or by internal collapses is difficult to say.
Other than from the SE crater, there is strong degassing from the Voragine as well as weak incandescence in the Voragine and the crater open on the eastern side of the SE crater.

Regular "mini-eruptions" at SE crater - an interpretation

Update Fri 19 May 2017 08:48
Strombolian activity at the SE crater's saddle vent and the peaks of tremor accompanying each short-lived episode (image: Boris Behncke / INGV Catania)
Strombolian activity at the SE crater's saddle vent and the peaks of tremor accompanying each short-lived episode (image: Boris Behncke / INGV Catania)
Since 11 May, Etna has been in an unusual state of activity. At remarkably regular intervals of approx. 8 hours, the "saddle vent", located between Etna's old and new Southeast Crater, has been producing more than 20 brief episodes of mild strombolian activity, each accompanied by a short-lived increase in volcanic tremor amplitude. The episodes are further characterized by the absence of strong degassing.

What causes this unusual and certainly transient behavior is not exactly known. Researcher Dr Marco Neri tries to give an explanation in an article on La Gazzetta Siracusana(loosely translated):
"In fact, Etna volcano produces "mini-eruptions" that last a few tens of minutes, located at the top of the New South-East Crater, at about 3300 meters. There would be nothing strange about this, except that these events occur with an impressive regularity, about 3 a day, and at fairly constant intervals of about eight hours. A phenomenon that closely resembles that of geysers, although in this case it is magma to erupt at the surface and not water. ...
These small eruptive events are always accompanied by an increase in the amplitude of volcanic tremor, which corresponds to a vibration produced by movements of volcanic fluids circulating within the eruptive duct. When the magma approaches the surface and erupts, tremor increases sharply. ... Therefore, the tremor graph shows a series of almost regular peaks for amplitude and intervals. It's like volcano's hiccups!

"Why do these mini-eruptions happen? What makes them so regular and frequent? Without claiming to always understand everything about a volcano, especially Etna which is full of surprises, we can try to give an answer:
Etna's feeding system, and in particular the eruptive ducts that feeds these eruptions, can be imagined like a narrow and long pressure pot. The heat of the magma is similar to the fire lit under the pot, while the gases separating from the magma and accumulating in the top of the duct correspond to the water vapor that forms inside the pot when the water is heated and bubbles.
Finally, the eruptive vent from which the mini-eruptions occur can be compared to the valve of our pressure cooker. Every time the gas pressure inside the duct exceeds a certain critical value, the "valve" opens and some magma erupts on the surface. And to complete the similitude, the characteristic "whistle" of the pot valve that opens can be compared to the hissing sounds that people nearby perceive during these mini-eruptions.

"The extraordinary nature of the phenomenon that we observe at the moment lies, however, in the fact of the remarkable regularity of the mini-eruptions, showing that the system has reached an excellent balance between the magma that is being fed from below into the upper ducts and the magma that is lost (expelled) from the system during these mini-eruptions.
What will happen?
How can the hiccups of Etna cease? The phenomenon may last for a long time, at least until this balance between the rising magma and the eruptions stays in place. Things will eventually change when the available magma volume will decrease, or, if the volume of fresh magma rising from below increases significantly, leading probably to eruptive episodes such as observed during the past months.
Also the geometry of the upper portion of the the vent, or, to stay in the image, our "volcano" vent valve, plays an important role: should this vent change, e.g. collapse, or become obstructed, it would certainly also change the course followed by magma to reach the surface, as well as the energy needed to produce an eruption.
In this case, it would change the eruptive style of the volcano and perhaps also the position of the eruptive vent." (Marco Neri / INGV Catania)
New effusive episode from SE crater during 26-28 April 2017
The two lava flows from the SE crater during the night 26-27 April 2017
The two lava flows from the SE crater during the night 26-27 April 2017
The first lava flow on the southern side of the SE crater and lava fountaining at the vent in the early hours of 27 April
The first lava flow on the southern side of the SE crater and lava fountaining at the vent in the early hours of 27 April
Steam from a melt-water avalanche on the northern lava flow in the morning of 27 April
Steam from a melt-water avalanche on the northern lava flow in the morning of 27 April
Another mainly effusive eruptive episode occurred from the SE crater during 26-28 April.
Starting from the evening of 26 April at around 18:00 local time, a lava flow started to emerge slowly from the summit vent of the Southeast Cone and descended to the south and then bended eastwards at the foot of the SE crater complex.
There was with no significant explosive activity in the beginning: this was likely because the first lava to be erupted was the remaining, degassed lava still in the conduit from the previous episode being pushed out first by a new batch of rising magma.
SE cone collapses, new lava flow to the north
During the night, after the new magma arrived at the surface and mild strombolian activity (or low pulsating lava fountains) started to occur as well, as effective degassing of the fresher magma. At around 01 am in the night, the SE cone collapsed partially, probably because its edifice, already fractured, could no longer withstand the pressure of magma in its conduit. A second lava flow emerged and traveled north from the vent.
The eruption with two lava flows continued all night and during the morning of 27 April.
Starting from noon of 27 April, the lava flow to the southern flank of the SE crater started to decrease and ceased by around 13:30. The northern lava flow continued during the evening, but also ceased during the night 27-28 April.

Phreatomagmatic explosions
During the morning of 27 April, the advance of the new lava flow on the northern side over fresh (not covered by recent flows) snow-covered ground triggered a series of small phreatomagmatic explosions.
The most significant such explosion took place between 08:46 and 08:48 local time. It begins with the emission of steam from the center of the lava flow, shortly followed by the ejection of fragments from the flow itself. This event also triggered a rapid melt-water hot avalanche that traveled about 700 m in less than 2 minutes.
A smaller melt-water flow was also observed earlier at around 06:52 local time.
Volcano webcams and seismic data live
The latest updates are on the top. Reload this page from time to time if you want to check for updates.
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